24 May 2019
Causes and Consequences of Persistent Statelessness in the Highlands of Thailand: Findings from the UNESCO Highland Peoples Survey
 
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"Causes and Consequences of Persistent Statelessness in the Highlands of Thailand: Findings from the UNESCO Highland Peoples Survey"

24 May 2019 10.00-12.00
Subaltern Room, Faculty of Social Sciences, Chiang Mai University

Presenters:
Amanda Flaim, PhD.
Assistant Professor of Public Affairs and Sociology at Michigan State University, former UNESCO Research Consultant
Fulbright-Hays Scholar, CESD CMU (2009-2010)

David Feingold, PhD.
Director, Ophidian Research Institute
Former International Coordinator for UNESCO HIV/AIDS and Human Trafficking Projects and Director (retired) of the UNESCO Highland Citizenship Project


To what extent is statelessness being resolved for highlanders in northern Thailand, and how does statelessness affect children, families, and communities today? While government reports indicate that statelessness is being resolved, data from the UNESCO Highland Peoples Survey suggest that gaps in resolution persist for as much as 20% of the population who were clearly eligible for citizenship by law. Ethnographic research indicates that these gaps persist, not despite, but because of legal evidentiary requirements that many highlanders cannot attain or produce. Moreover, while the government has enacted a range of progressive policies on education, health, and welfare policies to include stateless, or non-citizen highlanders, data suggest that the legacies of statelessness are shifting and are accruing to younger generations.

Organized by UNESCO and RCSD